Thursday, July 26, 2012
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Best Jobs In America

I recently came across this interesting Infographic, originally part of an article in CNN’s Money Magazine online.  They use very good criteria to decide what are good jobs: Pay, long-term potential, resistance to recessionary influences, quality of life, etc., and they consulted with industry professionals.  Look at the color coding if you are interested in a particular point of view, like best job for helping society (healthcare and education) and most flexibility (sales).  I hope your job is on the list!

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Posted by Mark Bregman at 4:09 PM

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Friday, July 20, 2012
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BOBsearch Attending Farnborough Intl’ Airshow

The Bobsearch team was in attendance at the international air show this month in the UK. Here are a few shots from the show rooms:

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Posted by Mark Bregman at 9:54 AM

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Monday, July 9, 2012
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BOBsearch hosts LA/OC WID Inaugural Event

The Bobsearch team was happy to host the inaugural Los Angeles/Orange County Women In Defense Event. WID is a national security organization aimed at supporting the recognition and advancement of women in all fields of national security. With nearly 45 in attendance, including the San Diego chapter president Robin Lipka, the event was very positive and provided information to many. Women in Defense is an organization that accepts men and women, for more information visit the national website: http://wid.ndia.org.

Posted by Mark Bregman at 11:16 AM

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Friday, May 18, 2012
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Hiring Challenges – a BOB Infographic

Hiring managers are frustrated. There are more applicants than ever for each position, and it is harder than ever to separate excellence from mediocrity – everyone looks good on paper!   Active and so-called “passive” job seekers continue to pursue alternatives to their current positions, figuring the grass MUST be greener on some other side of the street.  Most employment turnover is caused by bad hiring decisions.  Getting a solid replacement at the executive level can take 18 months before the replacement is truly effective.  What’s an employer to do?  Stay tuned for our next infographic (or if you need help now in getting better executives, it is OK to give us a call now!)

Posted by Mark Bregman at 4:03 PM

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Saturday, April 28, 2012
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Mentors: Get One / Be One

Most successful people can cite one or two key individuals who guided and helped them early on, and from whom they learned so much.  Mentors can be a significant part of our success.  People who have good mentors are lucky, right?  Luck is where preparedness meets opportunity.  We need to proactively seek mentors, and cultivate relationships with them, not wait for them to stumble upon us (although be open and ready for that if it happens!)

Anyone can benefit from a mentor.  An aspiring book writer of any age could certainly benefit from knowing successful published authors.  Someone seeking a career transition can connect and develop a relationship with someone who had succeeded in that newly targeted profession.  If I just want an attitude adjustment, if I want to know how to be more at ease and not stressed, I could find someone who is successful, but always embodies equilibrium and balance.

Especially if you are at the early end of your career, you want to find a mentor.

How does one connect with a potential mentor?  Look at the relationships you already have.  Who has their act together, and displays openness and friendship to you.  Who shows an interest in you?  Who seems to genuinely care about you, your accomplishments, your self-actualization?  This is an ideal prospect.  Spend more time with that person.  Ask them things you don’t usually think to ask.  Pick their brains!  You will be surprised how simple it is to cultivate a mentor relationship.  Most people are flattered and happy to be of value to someone else.

If there is no one in your own personal circle of contacts, consider a professional organization or society you already belong to, or could easily join.

If you have already “been there, done that”, and are successful, seek out opportunities to be a mentor.  Pay it forward.  Offer to chat more with less experienced people in your own organization, or even the children of your colleagues.   Engage in Netweaving, and introduce people to someone else who can be of value to them.  Good mentors don’t really tell their mentee what to do – they help them discover solutions on their own – they empower the mentee.

The world is just one big community, and it takes a village to succeed at many things.  Make sure your village is populated with special people who are ready willing and able to help you.

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Posted by Mark Bregman at 6:59 PM

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