Posts Tagged ‘executive search’

BOB Search Places Director of Alien Defense

Saturday, April 1st, 2017

aliens pic

Executive Search Firm Boyle Ogata Bregman (BOB Search) announced today that it has filled the position of Director of Alien Defense for an unnamed Federal agency.  “When we were first approached by the Administration, we thought they meant defending against illegal immigrants, but then they explained this was for extraterrestrial aliens,” said CEO Mark Bregman, adding, “so we thought that would be an exciting search.”

BOB Search scoured the country for experts on Alien Defense, and found many candidates who knew about Aliens, but not necessarily how to defend against them.  Leading candidates included film producer Roland Emmerich (Independence Day 1 & 2, The Day After Tomorrow, Godzilla), but when it was discovered that he was a German Citizen, the hiring authorities called him off.  Another finalist was Blink 182 Co-Founder Tom DeLonge, who has been researching Aliens for years.  However, it became known that the former punk-rocker had recent contact with former Clinton campaign manager John Podesta, and this caused concerns.

The candidate chosen cannot be named officially, due to the highly classified nature of the program, but we can disclose that he is a nationally known Space Cadet, now living in a fortified compound in Idaho.  The position was originally intended to be located in NORAD headquarters or Cheyenne Mountain, both fortified bases that would feel comfortable to the candidate chosen.  Recently, the Administration has indicated that the role will be based near Mar-A-Lago, in Florida, for unknown reasons.

BOB Search is pleased to have helped keep the USA and the planet secure.

 

 

Job Hunting Tip #4: Value Creation and Getting Jobs

Monday, April 13th, 2009

Grant Cardone’s latest blog is titled: 12 Tips to Getting a Job in Any Market. I agree with him, especially about showing how you can create value. It is critically important, especially for the executive job seeker, to NOT interview for a job, but to illustrate how he or she can create value by making money or saving money for the new employer. This applies particularly well to the “hidden job market”: situations where an employer is thinking about a change, but hasn’t listed or posted the job. Guess what? EVERY employer is thinking about making a change; getting rid of a poor performer that holds the company back.

Job hunting is a numbers game – you must contact lots of people to find the true opportunities. By networking with everyone you know to find out who might need your skills, you will connect with those hidden opportunities. Research the company before you call . Be ready to make a case for how and why you can have an impact, and you just might get in the door. Then you don’t have an interview; you have a sales call. You are the product; the employer is the buyer. If you can successfully show the “benefit to the buyer” of the “product’s features” – how you add value – you can create a position for yourself. See my previous blog on being a Pain Killer vs. a Vitamin, and apply these same ideas to yourself.

Job Hunting Tip #4: Value Creation and Getting Jobs

Monday, April 13th, 2009

Grant Cardone’s latest blog is titled: 12 Tips to Getting a Job in Any Market. I agree with him, especially about showing how you can create value. It is critically important, especially for the executive job seeker, to NOT interview for a job, but to illustrate how he or she can create value by making money or saving money for the new employer. This applies particularly well to the “hidden job market”: situations where an employer is thinking about a change, but hasn’t listed or posted the job. Guess what? EVERY employer is thinking about making a change; getting rid of a poor performer that holds the company back.

Job hunting is a numbers game – you must contact lots of people to find the true opportunities. By networking with everyone you know to find out who might need your skills, you will connect with those hidden opportunities. Research the company before you call . Be ready to make a case for how and why you can have an impact, and you just might get in the door. Then you don’t have an interview; you have a sales call. You are the product; the employer is the buyer. If you can successfully show the “benefit to the buyer” of the “product’s features” – how you add value – you can create a position for yourself. See my previous blog on being a Pain Killer vs. a Vitamin, and apply these same ideas to yourself.

Passion as a Predictor of Success

Thursday, February 12th, 2009

A business friend asked me today to comment on the idea that passion (for one’s business or vocation) could be the number one predictor of success. I disagreed. I have seen dozens of entrepreneurs present their businesses to investor groups ( I belong to TCA in OC). The investors get excited when the entrepreneurs are enthusiastic and demonstrate passion about their companies, products, potential, etc. There is a hitch though. Many of the most enthusiastic entrepreneurs, the ones that appear most passionate, have a couple of personality issues. In fact, I’d say that I’ve met many who have Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

There was a book written in the early nineties, (still available through Amazon), called The Productive Narcissist, which describes how these not-so-together people are incredibly charismatic, draw people to them, and often (but not always), succeed wildly, despite the negative traits that impact their relationships with others. See who the author gives as examples! So, my conclusion in this thesis about passion is that you must dig a little deeper to determine who the person really is, before you can judge a superficial pattern of passion as the best predictor of success.

Passion as a Predictor of Success

Thursday, February 12th, 2009

A business friend asked me today to comment on the idea that passion (for one’s business or vocation) could be the number one predictor of success. I disagreed. I have seen dozens of entrepreneurs present their businesses to investor groups ( I belong to TCA in OC). The investors get excited when the entrepreneurs are enthusiastic and demonstrate passion about their companies, products, potential, etc. There is a hitch though. Many of the most enthusiastic entrepreneurs, the ones that appear most passionate, have a couple of personality issues. In fact, I’d say that I’ve met many who have Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

There was a book written in the early nineties, (still available through Amazon), called The Productive Narcissist, which describes how these not-so-together people are incredibly charismatic, draw people to them, and often (but not always), succeed wildly, despite the negative traits that impact their relationships with others. See who the author gives as examples! So, my conclusion in this thesis about passion is that you must dig a little deeper to determine who the person really is, before you can judge a superficial pattern of passion as the best predictor of success.